Offers

Camino de Santiago

Your pilgrimage through Spain


Camino de Santiago Route: The Pilgrim's Path from St.Jean-Pied-de-Port to Santiago de Compostela

The complete
Camino Francés

34-days pilgrim's
Way of St. James - for experts

Camino Francés
Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port – Pamplona – Logroño – Santo Domingo de la Calzada – Burgos – Léon – Astorga – Ponferrada – Arzúa – Santiago de Compostela

-- learn more --
Camino de Santiago Northern Route: The Pilgrim's Path from Irun to Santiago de Compostela

Camino del Norte
Spanish Coastal Route

38-days individual
pilgrim´s path

Camino
Irun – San Sebastián – Gernika – Bilbao – Castro Urdiales – Santander – Llanes – Villaviciosa – Gijón – La Caridad – Ribadeo – Arzúa – Santiago

-- learn more --
Camino de Santiago original Route: The Pilgrim's Path from Oviedo to Santiago de Compostela

Camino
Primitivo

17-days
individual pilgrim´s path

Camino
Oviedo – Grado – Salas – Tineo – Borres – Berducedo –
Grandas de Salime – A Fonsagrada – O Cádavo – Lugo –
Ferreira – Melide – Arzúa – Santiago de Compostela

-- learn more --
Camino de Santiago Group travel Route: The Pilgrim's Path from Sarria to Santiago de Compostela

Guided group tour
Camino de Santiago

8-day pilgrimage from Sarria to
Santiago de Compostela

Camino
Sarria - Portomarín -
Palas del Rei - Arzúa - Amenal -
Santiago de Compostela

-- learn more --

The "Camino" is a famous pilgrimage route in Spain that attracts hikers and pilgrims from all over the world.

The route is named after St. James, one of the twelve apostles of Jesus Christ, whose remains are said to be buried in the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, which is the final destination of the pilgrimage.

The Camino is traditionally a religious pilgrimage, but it has become popular among hikers and outdoor enthusiasts as well. The route is a network of paths through Spain, Portugal and France, and there are several different routes that pilgrims can take to reach Santiago de Compostela.

The most popular route is the Camino Francés, which starts in the French town of Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port and ends in Santiago de Compostela, covering a distance of about 780 kilometers. Other routes include theCamino del Norte, which follows the northern coast of Spain and the Camino Primitivo, the oldest route which is considered the spanish original.

Pilgrimage on the Camino can be a challenging and rewarding experience, with pilgrims traversing varied terrain from mountains to plains and national parks, and passing through small villages and historic cities along the way. For pilgrims, the journey is also a spiritual one, with many seeking a deeper connection to their faith or simply looking for a sense of purpose and reflection.

Regardless of the reason for embarking on the Camino, all who walk it are considered pilgrims and are welcomed by the local communities along the route. The pilgrimage has a rich history dating back to the Middle Ages and has become a cultural and spiritual icon in Spain and beyond.